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Egg me on

October 25, 2011 by Andrea Godfreyson, Registered Dietitian

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Somehow my tiny studio apartment seems to be a resting place for friends. They always wake up to the smell of coffee and eggs…mostly because of the proximity of the stove to the couch. I like frittatas with pear, caramelized onions and brie, omelettes with sautéed mushrooms and kale, scrambles with zucchini, spinach, feta and fresh basil, but I always come back to simple poached eggs. I can’t explain the joy I feel when I poke my fork into a soft poached egg and the bright orangey yolk cascades out over my tower of vegetables. It is almost more than I can take.

I credit eggs with getting me through university as they are cheap eats, quick to make and are packed with nutrition. Breakfast, lunch and dinner all scream for eggs. I love how you can basically sauté up any vegetables you have in the fridge and mix them with eggs. The money I save on eggs also allows me to be more liberal with purchasing other ingredients, like fancy cheese or fresh herbs. For most people, eating the equivalent of an egg a day is healthy. If you have high cholesterol, heart disease or diabetes, call 8-1-1 to talk to a dietitian about how many eggs per week is recommended.

Secrets to the Perfect Poached Egg What's the Point?
Add a bit of vinegar (any kind will do) to the cooking water Helps to bind the egg and adds flavour
Swirl the water in a circle before adding the egg Helps the white come together
Simmer gently without boiling (for 3-5 minutes depending on how soft you like your yolk) Helps keep the white together
Press the yolk lightly with your finger (once it is out of the water of course) To test if it is cooked to your liking
Drain the little morsels on absorbent towel Helps avoid a soggy grande finale

 There are just a few steps to the perfect poached egg.  Now that you’re a pro, my signature poached eggs go like this: toasted whole wheat english muffins with a few slivers of avocado squished on, a thick slice of tomato, a soft poached egg perched on top and finished with a bit of shredded cheese (sharp is best for lots of flavour with just a little cheese) and cracked black pepper.

The cheese will melt on the hot egg and bring the entire tower to great heights. You are welcome. If you go so far as to cut an orange in half, scoop out the contents, make a fruit salad and serve it in the orange half with a spoonful of vanilla yogurt on the side of your egg towers, people will never leave your apartment. Trust me.

What comes first, the eggs, or the guests that overstay their welcome eating the eggs?

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Comments (2)

suzanne026

Posted on Thursday November 17, 2011 a 9:19am

How important is it to purchase organic, free range eggs over regular eggs? They are much more expensive and I wonder if it's worth it.

cpetelski's picture

HealthyFamilies BC

Posted on Friday November 18, 2011 a 10:11am

Great question suzanne026. It can be confusing as there are so many different types of eggs on the market. The nutrient composition of eggs does not vary significantly whether a hen is part of a conventional cage system, free run or free range system or whether an egg is organic or not. There are however, other factors beyond nutrition that may influence your choice of eggs. For some, these may include how they are produced, where they are from and how much they cost. With respect to agricultural practices, the BC Egg Marketing Board has an interesting video (http://bit.ly/bceggfarmers) that lays out (sorry for the pun) the basics regarding the conventional cage system, free range and free run systems in BC that you might find helpful as a start. Certified organic eggs are from hens that are free range, are fed a certified organic diet, and raised according to specific guidelines. The Canadian General Standards Board Organic Standards document (see Section 6.8) outlines the requirements for livestock living conditions for certified organic products, including egg producing hens. We have a lot of options for eggs in BC. Ultimately, the choice is a personal one. Here’s a FAQ page to start the process of deciding what the best choice is for you http://www.bcegg.com/files/faq-general.php. - Andrea

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