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How Older Adults Can Take Charge of Their Health

October 1, 2015 by HealthyFamilies BC

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Take an active role in protecting your health and well-being. Being aware of changing health needs helps you avoid chronic illnesses and emergency room visits. Speak with your doctor regularly and make healthy lifestyle choices.


Follow these simple tips to focus on your changing health needs.

  • Schedule checkups as recommended by your physician
    At the checkup, discuss screening tests (mammograms, blood tests, cancers) with your physician to identify any potential health problems. Early detection of health issues greatly increases the chances for successful treatment.
  • Prepare for medical appointments
    Take a list of questions and consider bringing a family member or friend for added support and to take notes.
  • Keep a medical journal
    Recording health professionals’ names and dates of medical visits along with your weight, blood type, blood pressure, vitamins, supplements, and medications in a simple binder or notebook helps  keep your medical information organized. You can also track test results, effects of prescribed medication, immunizations, allergies, surgeries, or other information you feel is important.

Did You Know?
People who have chronic health conditions and their family members can participate in free self-management programs offered in communities throughout BC.

  • Use prescription drugs correctly
    Medicines can help you manage your health, but only if you take them correctly. If you have any concerns or problems with taking your medicine as prescribed, contact your doctor or pharmacist to discuss.
  • Quit smoking
    Your body will start to heal itself almost immediately after you quit smoking. QuitNow is a free program that will support you to quit and remain smoke-free.

Fact: The chance of having a heart attack caused by smoking drops by half within one year after you butt out.

  • Watch your alcohol consumption
    As we age, our bodies process alcohol more slowly and we become more sensitive to the effects of alcohol. Drinking as we get older also puts an extra burden on the liver. According to the Low-Risk Alcohol Drinking Guidelines suggested limits for normal, healthy adults are 10 drinks a week for women and 15 drinks a week for men, and no more than two drinks per occasion for women and no more than three for men. Adults over the age of 65 should be careful to never exceed these guidelines due to their increased sensitivity to alcohol.

Did You Know?
The same amount of alcohol produces higher blood alcohol content in an older person than it does in a younger adult of the same weight.

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Topic

  1. Activity & Lifestyles
  2. Aging Well
  3. Pregnancy & Parenting
    1. Pregnancy & Birth
    2. Babies (0-12 months)
    3. Toddlers (12-36 months)
    4. Preschool (3-5 years)
    5. Children (6-11 years)
    6. Teens (12-18 years)
  4. Food & Nutrition

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