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Consider Your Child’s Opinion

November 30, 2014 by HealthyFamilies BC

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Children need to feel you are taking their opinions seriously. Listen to what they have to say, and respond.


See the situation through your child’s eyes. Try to understand and appreciate their point of view. You know how you feel when your boss or partner says, “That’s ridiculous”, or insists you really like something you know you don’t? Kids feel the same way when parents say, “You don’t really mean that” or “I can’t believe you said that!”

Acknowledge your child’s feelings. You might say something like, “I’m glad to know that” or “I understand”. At times, this acknowledgement is all your child needs to hear. At other times, your child may need a reflection of their feelings: “you felt angry when your friend talked with you that way”.

Try not to contradict your child immediately, even if you think your child is wrong. Hear your child out before saying no. If your child says, “I don’t want to go to school anymore”, instead of saying, “You have to go”, you might ask, “What is happening at school that makes you want to stay home?”

Listen to your child’s request without judging or correcting it. Good teachers give children a chance to explain themselves first, even if they’re wrong. The same technique works at home.

Acknowledge your child’s feelings with a question
Like grown-ups, children want to feel that their opinions matter – and often get mad when they are told they are wrong. Instantly contradicting your child’s opinion often escalates to an immediate fight over who is right. A specific question about the situation might instead prompt a useful discussion.
– Michael Thompson, PhD, co-author of Raising Cain

© Raising Children Network Limited, reproduced with permission.

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